TechnologyTell

See how these kids react as they play the “ancient” Apple II

Thanks to TheFineBros, we’re reminded of how technology has evolved for the past few decades (making us feel old, too). Their recent video on YouTube, in partnership with the Halt and Catch Fire team, shows how 7-13 year-old kids react to the old computers—particularly the Apple II computer, circa 1977.

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Run your Mac up to 40 times faster with RamDisk

A concept from Classic Mac OS pioneering days still offers some advantages in the SSD era with RamDisk for Mac from Power App.

Musings on living in the ditch beside the InfoBahn for five days

New Year’s rang in here in my neck of the woods with an Internet outage. A winter storm blew in and we lost our wireless broadband service in the wee hours of December 30th, 2012. My dial-up Internet backup may be excruciatingly slow, but it beats the whizz out of having no Internet access at all. Here’s a salute to old, “obsolete” technologies. Not dead yet!

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Apple’s Newton eMate 300 was an iPad and MacBook Air forerunner

Nearly 16 years ago in March, 1997, Apple released the eMate 300—a non-Mac clamshell laptop with an ARM processor running Apple’s Newton 2.1 PDA system software. Discontinued less than a year after it debuted, the eMate 300 was in many ways ahead of its time, and in a very real sense was a conceptual ancestor of both the MacBook Air, the iPad, and Ultrabooks, to say nothing of the flash-in-a-pan PC netbook fad.

Apple patents “Ionic Wind Generator” – return to quiet computing?

Claimed in the patent application is a processing device comprising an ionic wind generator configured to generate a flow of ionized air along a path and a deflection field generator located proximate the path of the flow. Translation: a presumably silent means of cooling down internal components in electronic devices.

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Pismo PowerBook: The dozen-year Energizer Bunny of laptops

My two PowerBook G3 2000 FireWire (aka Pismo) laptops just go on and on and on. Now a dozen years old, they’re still going strong in day-to-day production use. They’re almost certainly the best value in a computer hardware purchase I’ve ever made or am ever likely to make, and there’s no obvious reason to suspect I won’t still have a Pismo on the go when they turn thirteen.

mLogic Docking Station for MacBook Pro recalls Apple’s PowerBook Duo concept

mLogic LLC is now shipping its new mDock docking station and backup solution for mid-2009 to current 13- and 15-inch unibody MacBook Pro (MBP) computers. I’ve been a fan of the dockable laptop computer since Apple pioneered the concept with the PowerBook Duo back in the early ’90s. As much as I admired the Duo, I couldn’t afford one back in the day, but I continue to be convinced it’s an elegant solution for making your laptop do double-duty as both mobile computer and desktop substitute.

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Mac laptops at NASA’s Mission Control go way back

As Jake Gaecke reported here earlier this week, shots of Mission Control in Houston during the spectacular Curiosity Mars rover landing show that Mac laptops are well-represented these days at NASA/JPL. It’s also worth noting that MacBooks at Mission Control actually go way back.

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The “Luxo” iMac G4 10 years later – an appreciation

The iMac G4—one of Apple’s most elegant, innovative and brilliant desktop computer designs ever—is celebrating its 10th anniversary this year. I would like to think Apple might someday decide to build another iMac with a “Luxo” type display mount, but alas, it’s not a very optimistic hope.

A closer look at the new Modbook Pro

After corporate reorganization, a new company, ModBook Inc., has announced an updated Modbook Pro, a portable 13.3-inch MacBook-based pen tablet computer. Available with up to a 2.9GHz processor, the Modbook Pro is scheduled to begin shipping in the U.S. in early fall. It’s also the only tablet computer that can boot into both OS X and Windows 7, unlocking two applications ecosystems.

Inside Apple by Adam Lashinsky available now

Following the recent success of Walter Isaacson’s biography on former Apple CEO Steve Jobs comes another more corporately-focused book on the company that Jobs co-founded and brought so much success to throughout his adult life. Inside Apple by Adam Lashinsky brings to light Apple’s (and Jobs’ as well, to a lesser extent) business side and how the company operates instead of the personal coverage that Isaacson’s biography brought.

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Apple’s USB Modem incompatible with OS X Lion

Apple has quietly made the Apple USB modem incompatible with OS X Lion, which was verified on Cult of Mac when they tried to use their modem and received an error message. While it’s true that most people don’t need or want to connect to the Internet via dial-up and that other USB modems will work if they have updated drivers, some people do occasionally need dial-up, especially for fax functionality.