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OMG, You Guys, MTV Is Totally Changing the Movie Awards!

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The MTV Movie Awards is “classing up” its popular show, an annual early summer tradition, according to The Hollywood Reporter.

THR reports that MTV has assembled an “academy [ooh, fancy] of actors, producers, agents, and other industry insiders to vote on nominees, including a ‘breakthrough performance’ award voted on by directors.” The network declined to reveal the voters’ identities.

A shadow academy? Man, oh, man, it doesn’t get much classier than that. It’s just like Skull and Bones! Or the PTA!

The intent behind this collective of voters “is to broaden the nominees and winners and lend some credibility to an event that has been criticized as merely a venue for Hollywood to promote its summer blockbusters,” writes THR’s Marisa Guthrie.

According to Guthrie’s exclusive, these moves—which include adding and removing several categories—are meant to deepen the “music-movie experience” and to celebrate acting, not just who is on the most magazine covers. (Finally, Robert Pattinson has some incentive to step up his game. And Dame Judi Dench will be exposed to a whole new audience.)

Part of me praises MTV’s intentions. Still, why bother? Some would say the show’s lack of substance is its calling card; the critics’ awards and tuxedoed galas can anoint emerging talent; bring on the stars and the envelope-pushing goofiness! Last year’s shrieking festivities pulled in “4.5 million viewers, registering its largest teen audience since 2004,” according to THR.

Also, there are plenty of options for teens, especially those in the suburbs, to discover films other than big-honking blockbusters. This isn’t 1994, when young filmmakers depended on TV, magazines, and newspapers to spread the word of a barely-funded masterpiece.

Is MTV going to be another outlet to promote truly great films—showing that they’re fun and sexy and daring—or will no one care the moment Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson shows up?

I think the latter is more likely to occur. And you know what? There’s nothing wrong with that.

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