TechnologyTell

11 school apps that will make this school year so much easier

Sections: Apple, Cellphones

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Remember those dreaded assignment books that made school seem like it was going to be a breeze on the first day, but quickly ended up lost, shredded, or just plain left unused? iHomework replaces this relic. It’s the perfect app to help keep you organized whether you’re earning your Master’s degree or just starting middle school. It’s integrated with Questia which offers tons of material for research purposes, making research papers and projects that much less of a pain in the arse. Sync all your information between your iPhone, iPod and Mac along with iCloud support for iOS 6 and up.

 

iTunes U offers over 600,000 free courses, books, lectures, study material, and other things. Using your Apple ID, you can sync with all of your Apple devices for access anywhere. If you need to read 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea or some other fabulous classic and the school store is selling them at $30 a pop, bail on that store and use iTunes U. If you can’t afford school or you’ve graduated and desperately miss learning for the sake of learning (like I do) you can always access these courses and continue your education for free and without permission or judgement.

 

World Atlas 2013 is only 99 cents and takes the frustration out of referencing an atlas. This app let’s you know your exact position upon opening and offers four zoomable maps including timezone, satellite, physical, and political. The maps also offers three different types for bigger zoom options and come with a compass that shows your path and details on each country.

 

Kno Textbooks is a free app that offers 200,000 books at reasonable prices. Text books account for far too much of college costs and, usually, resale value isn’t even worth it. These digital versions come with the added benefit of interactive 3D models, search engines, videos, and flash cards for the visual learners (nearly everybody). You can also keep an eye on your studies progress with incorporated journals. Sharing notes with classmates no longer requires lending out your notebook for two days (so stressful) and you can import PDF files from the internet, email and Dropbox.

 

Nothing is more enraging than being denied your current standing in a class. Even with tools like Blackboard and Powerschool, teachers rarely upload grade information for student access because they’re selfish and lazy (kidding!). Teachers are busy and don’t have time to cater to every student’s anxieties every day, so My Grades & Homework lets students input all of their grade information as they receive it for quick calculations of GPA and semester grading information. The data is automatically backed up to an integrated Dropbox account for security. This way, you’ll always know exactly what grade you need to achieve on the Final so you don’t drop your final grade point average.

 

We all used Wikipedia for almost everything in school, whether we admit it or not. But the site is newly refurbished and far more reliable, making it a more valid resource for school work. Wikibot is a reader specifically designed for Wikipedia that makes researching almost anything a better experience, even if it’s just preliminary research. It syncs with iCloud, changes the font to your liking, supports 36 different languages and allows for social media sharing.

Cooliris is another app for visual learners, but is far more comprehensive. If your teacher doesn’t have a decent visual aid for his or her lesson, Cooliris offers a full screen search that offers large 3D photos of virtually anything. Now let’s see those ecosystem diagrams, Teach.

 

 

 

Evernote is a cure-all for note-taking. Not only can you take and store as many notes as you want, you can take pictures of syllabi and assignments which can be translated into easily searchable stockpiles of information, i.e. due dates and page lengths. Everything syncs between your Apple devices for easy access.

 

 

CourseSmart is another way to access digital versions of textbooks. They cost roughly half the price of their physical counterparts and last for a 180-day subscription period, after which they disappear. The database offers over 7,000 books.

 

Stanza links to Project Gutenberg which maintains 30,000 classic books under public domain that you can access for free. You can also access magazine and newspaper content which, in my experience, makes teachers absolutely giddy when included in your bibliography– it really shows you went the extra mile to find information.

 

Well, the days of $100 graphic calculators are officially behind us. Graphing Calculator is an app the does the job for only 99 cents, along with an expanded scientific calculator. It can’t handle advanced calculus but is more than adequate for high school students. Plus, it emails results so you can go back and check your work.

 

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One Comment

  1. You can’t assume all students use Apple devices. What about Android and Google Play, which have added educational? So, stop talking about Apple all the time.

    Davin