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Laptops to be powered up by methanol fuel cells

Sections: Computers, Gadgets / Other, Laptops, Miscellaneous

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Samsung Fuel Cell Computer

Powering up a laptop with portable liquid fuel? It’s genesis is closer than you might think. The company PolyFuel, which develops fuel cell membranes, recently announced that it has developed a prototype laptop (the Lenova T40 ThinkPad), which uses methanol cartridges and a fuel cell as it’s power source.

Although the working prototype is not an actual finished product, but instead a proof of concept, the company plans to show it off to consumer electronics and PC manufacturers in the coming weeks.

The machine uses what is called a direct methanol fuel cell (or a DMFC) that converts methanol to electricity to run the laptop. The cartridges are approximately the size of a deck of cards, and just one can provide 10 hours of battery life. The company is as yet unwilling to provide images of the prototype, but company President and CEO Jim Balcolm did provide descriptions. He said that the fuel cells bulge out a little more than the nine-cell battery on a Lenova T40, and it raises the laptop a little. However, it is substantially lighter and provides as much run-time as about three lithium-ion batteries.

Backers for the design say they like it since the cartridges are portable and can provide that longer running time. Since manufacturers are very much wanting to find ways to extend battery life for their portable devices, it would be a boon for consumers to have a means to go all day or night without having to carry around an AC adapter. Thus PolyFuel’s strategy to license it’s system design and sell it’s membrane technology to manufacturers.

Although manufacturers estimate that such devices may not end up taking over the entire market, they estimate about ten to thirty percent, even at the niche market of ten percent it would still be considered significant. So, although alternative fuel cells may not be replacing batteries, it looks like they will in fact be a reality in consumer electronics within the next couple of years.

Read [CNet]

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2 Comments

  1. Under military funding, a Califorinia company named Ultracell has developed a 25W methanol fuel cell system capable of running a rugged laptop for 8 hours at a time. Using 250cc canisters of methanol (about the weight of a can of Coke), the system can convert the methanol to hydrogen and the hydrogen to electricity.

    While lugging around laptop fuel doesn't sound all that much better than batteries, this methanol system would shave 65% of the weight from what our soldiers carry now (which is a hefty 27 pounds of batteries per 72-hour mission). And if we were soldiers, we'd gladly spend that weight savings on guns and diapers.

    maximus
  2. yeah,the advice is very nice.The problem was
    <a href="laptop" rel="nofollow">http://www.etech.com/laptops-laptop-batteries–c1146_1162">laptop batteries developed a memory when not fully cycled to not use part of their capacity that wasn't drained.
    so I often Run the Battery Down.

    L.A. Rush