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Sprint looking to expand their horizons to other devices

Sections: Business News, Cellphones, Cellular Providers, Communications, Computers, Gadgets / Other, GPS/Navigation, Mobile, Smartphones, Transportation, Wireless

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When you think of Sprint, you probably think of phones and the wireless carrier. However, in less than a year, you may be associating Sprint with other companies such as Amazon, Garmin, Eastman Kodak, SanDisk, and Ford. How does Sprint plan to associate themselves with big name companies such as the aforementioned ones? By supplying their wireless Internet services to companies that could possibly benefit from it.

Amazon Kindle and beyond

If you own an Amazon Kindle, you may already know that Amazon has an exclusive deal with Sprint that uses their network to download books straight to the Kindle device. While this doesn’t generate a whole lot of revenue for Sprint, it does give them a decent amount of money and the Kindle itself is pretty popular. Now, Sprint’s popularity as a cellphone carrier has declined as of late, even though they are always doing things to improve their network. They have realized that expanding into other markets, and lending out their services might be the way to survive this recession and generate outside revenue.

Wholesaling Sprint service

In addition to working with Amazon, Sprint also wishes to provide wireless Internet services to prominent GPS manufacturer Garmin, camera company Eastman Kodak, and storage company SanDisk. Basically, whenever data is transmitted by any device ran by these companies using Sprint’s service, they make some sort of profit. While wholesaling is not as profitable as retail selling, it provides a nice amount of revenue and Sprint does not have to worry about customer support or billing expenses. Over time, customer support and billing expenses add up, so avoiding this will save Sprint some money.

In terms of Ford, Sprint plans to bring wireless Internet services to their lineup of vehicles and users would be charged a standard Sprint monthly usage bill. It makes sense that Sprint has decided to expand their horizons and find other places to inject their wireless services, because other competitors such as AT&T and Verizon are looking to do the same.

Connected devices and Sprint

Furthermore, there have been a few new devices that work with Internet only. Some that come to mind are the Nokia N810 Internet Tablet and the Peek Pronto. Email has become all the rage in recent years and people are accessing them on their phones or specific devices such as the Peek. It will be interesting to see if Sprint decides to develop a similar device or power a device manufactured by someone else. Either way, this is a step in the right direction to improve Sprint’s profits. Only time will tell if they are able to generate substantial revenue.

Read [WSJ]

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