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Macbook Pro update rumors – SSD, Retina Display, Ivy Bridge, USB 3.0

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Rumors and speculation regarding the updates to Apple’s line of Macbook Pro laptops continue to builds up as the inevitable refresh of Apple Macbook line starts getting closer. Some believe that Apple will eliminate the 17 inch model from their line up. Others believe that Apple will consolidate their line entirely blurring the line between the Macbook Air line and the Pro line. A completely redesigned exterior, complete with eliminated ports and a much slimmer case is also making the rumor rounds. Here is a consolidated list of rumors:

1. Retina Display: ABC News is reporting that Apple will be doubling the resolution (quadrupling the pixels) on the displays, bringing them up to Retina Display standards, at about 220 ppi pixel density. OS X 10.8, Mountain Lion, already has support for higher resolution screens.

2. SSD drives: Rumor has it that Apple will use the small form factor SSD drives, like the ones currently used in Macbook Airs, standard in their Macbook Pros, bringing speed improvements to the entire line.

3. Elimination of optical drives: With the advent of the Mac App store and the decline of physical media, such as CDs and DVDs, Apple feels that removing the optical drive will allow for thinner and lighter machines.

4. Ivy Bridge processors: The latest generation Intel processors are more power efficient and they run cooler, making them the perfect match for slimmed down Macbook Pros. The addition of USB 3.0 ports and the integrated NVIDIA GTX 650M GPU will be able to drive the Retina displays without hesitation.

5. No more ethernet or Firewire ports: Thunderbolt will be used primarily as a high-speed communication pipe, instead of relying on older-generation ports. Keep in mind that those looking for backwards compatibility with their existing gear and networking will be able to use USB or Thunderbolt to Ethernet adapters and Thunderbolt to Firewire adapters, currently available.

Via [Ars Technica]

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