TechnologyTell

Fox News crossed the listicle line

Kim Komando wrote a story on Fox News called “Divorcing? 5 Things to do Online Now.” Yeah! All casual, just like that. Almost as if the headline should be, “Thinking of taking up gardening? Here’s 5 Things to do Online Now.” But no, it’s about divorce.

Cyber attacks also affecting small, medium-size businesses

Large businesses are usually the ones that people think need to be heavily protected from cyber attacks, but a new report from Symantec shows that all businesses are at-risk. Cyber attacks against small and medium-sized businesses have been growing quickly, just as they have among large-scale businesses and government agencies. Symantec’s data shows that in 2013, the attacks rose significantly over 2012, and the same is expected to happen this year.

Report has proof of Chinese military cyber attacks

Countries in Europe and North America have long claimed that there is evidence of the Chinese government using hackers to attack Western targets but until recently, there was little public evidence to back up those claims. Last month, the US finally put a name on one of the Chinese groups allegedly involved in cyber attacks and a new report has named yet another group that is targeting governments and businesses in the West. A report from security company CrowdStrike says that a group nicknamed “Putter Panda” has been targeting American, European, and Japanese companies since at least 2007.

Hackers don’t use great passwords either

If there is one group of people who should understand basic web security, it’s hackers. A person who breaks into networks and steals information from unsuspecting victims on a daily basis would be expected to protect their own data but it turns out that they might just be like everyone else. Security firm Avast has found that most passwords used by hackers are no more secure than the average password and could be cracked or guessed.

GameOver Zeus botnet takes short-term blow from authorities

In a multinational operation, authorities from the US, UK, and EU were able to temporarily halt the GameOver Zeus botnet that has been stealing bank account information and infecting computers. By putting a stop to the botnet, authorities say that businesses and individuals will essentially have a two-week period to defend themselves and get rid of the botnet before the malware begins to spread once again.

NSA collects millions of images for facial recognition

Every single day, the National Security Agency (NSA) collects millions of photos from social media, text messages, emails, and other communications for its large facial recognition programs. NSA whistle blower Edward Snowden collected the documents that explain these spy programs and the documents were reported on in The New York Times.

Criminals are winning in the cybercrime battle

No matter how advanced or expensive an organization’s cybersecurity software is, criminals seem to be able to get around that security without much trouble. The 2014 State of Cybercrime Survey from PcW has found that hackers are breaking into US businesses at an unprecedented rate despite the emphasis that businesses now have on security. PcW gathered its data from 500 executives at companies, law enforcement agencies, and the government.

Snowden tells NBC that he is a spy

Edward Snowden, the man behind the NSA leaks, has told NBC News’ Brian Williams that despite all of the things that people have referred to him as in the media, he is actually a “spy”, or at least was trained like one. Snowden explains that he worked undercover for government agencies like the CIA and NSA. Since he was always pretending to be someone else and worked to implement security systems around the world, Snowden thinks that from a professional point-of-view, he is a spy and not just a system administrator.

Pentagon report says scope of Snowden leaks is staggering

To no one’s surprise, the Pentagon is not happy about Edward Snowden, the former NSA contractor who has given thousands of secret documents to journalists around the world. In a Pentagon report that was partially secured by The Guardian, it is clear that from the US intelligence community’s point of view, the impact of Snowden’s leaks is tremendous.

Network security doesn’t usually stop breaches

Businesses are forced to deal with security breaches on a consistent basis and according to a new report, dealing with those breaches by setting up network security software may not be effective. A security study has been published by FireEye that shows 97 percent of businesses that have some form of network security setup have been breached during the past six months.

Cisco asks President Obama to get NSA under control

Cisco CEO John Chambers has sent a letter to US President Barack Obama asking that he work to reign in the National Security Agency (NSA). The letter was sent as a result of newly leaked NSA documents that appear to show the agency intercepting Cisco products and hacking them so that they can be monitored upon reaching consumers. Not only was the interception process described in the documents, a picture was included that actually shows agency members implementing a backdoor.

Photo shows NSA adding spy equipment to router

Glenn Greenwald’s new book No Place To Hide is providing a slew of NSA documents and files that were not previously included in media coverage. While there are many interesting things included in the book and in the files, one has come out at exactly the right time. An NSA photo from June 2010 shows agency members adding a “beacon” to a Cisco router that was intercepted.