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Pathfinder MMO is a go

Sections: Gaming News, MMO, Role-Playing, Tabletop

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Welp, I was wrong. With a few hours to go, the Pathfinder massively multiplayer online game (MMO) found its way to a million dollar Kickstarter goal. It’s amazing what goodwill can do for a company when it comes to raising money, as the average backer kicked in over $100 to see this sandbox game come to reality.

A few backers kicked in thousands of dollars (including one guy for $10,000) for the privilege of contributing to the game. Funny thing is, the MMO doesn’t even plan to play like Pathfinder, promising a classless system. Tabletop Pathfinder, based on 3rd edition Dungeons and Dragons rules, is all about developing your character along optimal class lines. Past that, the game promises all the usual things for MMOs still in development: no grinding, meaningful crafting, incredible immersion, and all the rest. When the game goes online, it’s certain to have a dedicated fanbase, key to any successful MMO.

It’ll be years before the MMO is available for actual play (at least, if it’s going to be any good), but there are loads of other goodies promised to backers like miniatures and adventures that are certain to be available long before the computer game. I’m looking forward to a few of these when they appear on game store shelves.

I was hardly alone in underestimating the support for this project (see therpgsite), but I certainly wish them all the best, and will give the game a whirl when it comes out, someday.

Product Page [Kickstarter] Read [therpgsite]

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  • Doomfield

    I guess my problem with this article and your former one is that you raise points that, while I can understand your point of view if you look at the mmo market so far, are all addressed in the Goblinworks blog. Which would also be fine if you acknowledged that they brought them up, but you simply disagree. When you bring up development time and the woes of the mmo market place, all things that they acknowledge and give examples of how they are trying to prevent these problems during development, it makes me feel you’re just going with your gut on this. Look in to Planetside 2’s development time they made the game in a year and half, and while I am fully ready to agree that game is just ok right now. It doesn’t have millions wrapped up into development that the game company will never recoup, it only needs a moderate success for SOE to make money on the project. There are a few videos on development time for PFO, they have exciting (atleast i believe so) ideas on how to get the game to people who want play it and help in the development process in a content feedback sort of way.

  • Doom

    To be more accurate, the points addressed at Goblinworks’ website are addressed via the same way the last several hundred MMOs have been addressed those issues: promises.

    Go back and see if you can find all the promises about Warhammer Online…and tell me those promises were really fulfilled and that Warhammer Online is the greatest game ever. Tell me with a straight face that WHO has really dominated the MMORPG market..seriously, there’s a gulf of difference between saying “this will be the greatest game ever” and actually making the greatest game ever.

    I’m glad they got the support, I hope it works outto the satisfaction of all the folks that shelled out $100 or more to it (and this is a really top-heavy supporter kickstarter, or so it seems), and I absolutely hope it’s a great game.

    I have more people coming to play Pathfinder at my table than I have room for people at the table. I’m a fan, but I’ve been to a rodeo or two before, is all.