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Is Nest thermostat ‘smart’ enough to overcome a lawsuit?

Sections: HVAC, Smart Home

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Ever since the Nest learning thermostat became widely available to consumers, the popularity has soared. People are attracted to a home heating and cooling solution that saves on energy costs. The Nest learns your schedule and programs itself accordingly, promising to lower bills by up to 20 percent. It’s too bad it won’t work on attorneys, as things are heating up for Nest in court.

Nest thermostatJustin Darisse from Maryland has initiated a lawsuit against Nest, and he’s looking to turn it into the class-action kind. He claims Nest has not saved him any money, but has actually increased his energy bills instead. The reasoning behind this complaint is that the device generates internal heat, causing the temperature sensor to read anywhere between two to ten degrees higher than it should.

Nest retails for $249.99 on Amazon and has an overall rating that indicates satisfaction. However, there are a number of comments by other customers pointing to the same defect that Justin Darisse has been experiencing. He’s seeking $5 million on behalf of thousands of Nest owners.

As a company that touts its product as the next-generation thermostat, such a lawsuit can seriously damage that reputation. But this isn’t the only kind of complaint that the Nest thermostat has suffered. A small percentage of owners have experienced firmware-related issues and extremely long wait times for customer support.

Although Nest says they take each complaint seriously, even if problems may not be related to the Nest thermostat. Either way, people are switching back to their old tried-and-true analog Honeywell units (who, incidentally makes smart thermostats, too…review coming this week). No matter the features or technological spin, Nest is still a computer that suffers from problems other computers do. The difference is that a malfunctioning laptop doesn’t create the same level of inconvenience and discomfort as a malfunctioning thermostat.

<Source: gigaom>

 

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