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Video Innovation Promises to Make Just About Any TV 3D

Sections: 3D, Projectors, TVs, Video

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Video Innovation claims that they have produced a box that will add 3D display capabilities to any 60 or 120hz display, so long as a true 3D source is plugged into it. The first model, designed for gaming, is scheduled to ship in February at $199 for the box, or $259 with glasses and $79 for each additional pair. Additional units tailored toward television and home theater viewing are forthcoming.

While I’m sure that the boxes will work as advertised, outputting a signal that could work really well, I think there’s going to be a lot of disappointed people out there. One of the reasons why 3D televisions from major manufacturers like Sony or Panasonic cost so much is because they have to use new fast decay panels that ensure that image A is off the screen by the time image B needs to be displayed. If pieces of image A are still around, it generates ghosting or crosstalk that can ruin the 3D experience. If you own a 120hz DLP projector or RPTV, a display system with virtually instantaneous decay, and can get a refund if it doesn’t work, it might be worth a shot. Until there’s some reviews in, I would say buyer beware on any pre-orders for use on flat panel televisions.

Contact info:
Video Innovation
561.355.0601

VIP 3D

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One Comment

  1. > “any” 60hz panel
    > most likely using active shutter glasses
    oh good god the flicker … I can feel a migrane coming on already. Even 120hz won’t be brilliant… hands up anyone here who remembers the days of 60hz refresh on computer CRTs? this will appear far more akin to that than the somewhat kinder 60hz refresh of domestic TVs, as the shutters will give an effect closer to that of fast-response monitor phosphor than slow-response TV type.

    I’m just not prepared to accept shutter glasses until they can give the equivalent of at least 75hz to each eye, preferably 100hz+ … (so 150-200hz at the screen … and good luck finding a way to actually feed a set with image data refreshing at that speed)

    Really, apart from those customers with cloth eyes, this smacks somewhat of the “turns any tv into a colour set!” overlays that were sold in the heyday of monochrome CRTs … which when bought, turned out to be a strip of green, beige and blue cellophane, perfect for Little House on the Prairie and not much else.

    tahrey