TechnologyTell

nTelos and DISH Network Start Testing Wireless Broadband

Sections: Streaming, Video

0
Print Friendly

nTelos Dish AntennaDISH Network brings satellite service to a lot of rural households that are underserved by cable companies. Of course, the lack of cable also tends to leave millions of US citizens still stuck on dial-up for lack of broadband access.  Using some of its wireless spectrum, and separate from its own satellite-based broadband service, DISH is currently experimenting with broadband towers to bring wireless high-speed internet to a new slice of the market, along with partner nTelos.

Starting with two test sites in Waynesboro and Afton, VA, the two companies are delivering wireless speeds between 20 and 50 Mbps to new rural markets, using the 2.5 GHz spectrum.

Via Electronic House:

The difference between this and other trials is that the installation included rooftop devices on the participants’ homes. DISH says that this solution delivers advantages over antennas located inside the home… The trial used BandRich ruggedized outdoor routers with built-in high-gain antennas to receive the 2.5 GHz LTE signal.

“With nearly a fifth of American households underserved by broadband, a fixed wireless solution delivering true broadband speeds will bring improved broadband options to potentially millions of consumers,” said Tom Cullen, DISH executive vice president of Corporate Development. “DISH has a nationwide workforce of professional technicians that can be dispatched to install both a satellite dish for our video service and an antenna for broadband on the same roof at the same time.”

But what will it cost? The story doesn’t say. DISH and nTelos currently charge prices akin to those on your cell phone plan, caps included. For them to really revolutionize, they’re going to have to offer caps that are more conductive to normal human activity like streaming or gaming. An acquaintance of mine runs his business from a mobile broadband puck, and that holds him back to 3GB of data a month, which means he’s always counting his bits to make sure he doesn’t go over. If Dish can’t provide at least 30-50GB at an affordable price, I don’t see him, or others in his situation switching.

Hopefully the combination of TV service and a hungry customer base will  allow fast deployment, and a lot of grateful customers quickly, and soon.

Hit the source link for more info, including a video.

Via: [Electronic House]

0
Print Friendly