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Forget Voice-Activation – Bark-Activated Automation is the Future!

Sections: Remote control, Security, Smart Home

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bark activated home automationThe Rasberry Pi has inspired a lot of people to create unique fixtures and devices for their homes. Like this one, in which a gentleman in Ireland decided to take care of his new pup’s early-morning potty break needs with a bit of Pi-based DIY bark-activated home automation and a lot of ingenuity. Yes, I said bark-activated. Following in the footsteps of voice-activated automation solutions like VoicePod and the new ivee, he created an automated door opener based on his girl’s particular woofing habits and schedules:

She barks at night when she’s left out. She barks early in the morning when she’s left in. So once I recognized the patterns of her barking, I realized that all I needed was something that would let her out when she needed to go for a pee, usually around 6:30 in the morning. I could do this with a timer switch and a door strike, but where’s the fun in that?

I wanted this to be an educational project, so I decided I’d use the Raspberry Pi again, this time for a non-camera related project. And I decided on a bark activated automatic door opener…

It involves a bark detector (noise detector circuit) wired to the input of the Raspberry Pi so that it can detect the barks. A motor driver circuit to drive the actuator that unlocks the door, and a weight/pulley system that swings the door open when its unlocked.

The hallmark of a good home automation system is that it should adapt to your specific lifestyle, and what better example than this?

All the parts and the code for the bark-activated Rasberry Pi program are at the source link, so if you’re looking for a weekend project and have an independent pooch with a kooky schedule, this certainly is a high-tech alternative to a doggie door.

Raspberry Pi units are now readily available at stores like Fry’s and Micro Center, so you should be able to score one as easily as you do the regular hardware.

Via [David Hunt] via [Gizmodo]

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