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Texan Tundra: In Which We Again Lament a Lack of Trucky Things To Do

Sections: Chassis, Powertrain

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2014 Toyota Tundra 1794 Edition Photo Shoot 021

(Lyndon Johnson photo)

Back when we had a Nissan Titan PRO-4X, I lamented a lack of honey-dos that necessitated the truck’s capabilities. My week in the stout Toyota Tundra 1794 Edition brought that lament back to the surface.

As Toyota’s specs site shows, the Tundra in CrewMax 1794 trim can haul a total payload of 1,505 lbs and tow 10,000 lbs. It splits the difference with its Japanese competitor in the Titan PRO-4X, which can haul more in its bed (1,733 lbs) but has a lower tow rating of 9,300 lbs. The Tundra’s 5.7-liter i-FORCE gasoline V8 handily out-powers the VK-series gasoline V8 in the Titan 381 horsepower to 317. It also out-twists the Nissan’s 385 ft-lbs of torque at a hearty 401 ft-lbs. Though I didn’t get to truly test the response of either powertrain under heavy loads, I can say the Toyota Tundra’s power felt every bit as strong as its numbers suggest in comparison to the Titan’s. Give the assist to the Tundra’s slick six-speed automatic gearbox, which remained smooth under lighter throttle pressures, then dialed up the revs — and the authoritativeness of shifts — when the skinny pedal was harrassed.

2014 Toyota Tundra 1794 Edition Photo Shoot 022

(Lyndon Johnson photo)

I did load both up with for souls to hit the town and found the Tundra 1794 edition both more luxurious and refined than the Titan PRO-4X. That’s not so much a knock against the Titan PRO-4X we tested earlier this year. The trucks were created for different audiences — the Titan PRO-4X for rugged, off-roading types who appreciate a thumpin’ sound system, and the Tundra for the boss of said rugged, off-roading types. He seldom goes off-road, and his posterior appreciates the supple cowhide of the 1794 Edition’s seats almost as much as his aging knees and hips appreciate the cab-length running boards. Where the Titan PRO-4X had Rancho off-road suspension that could make its on-road manners a bit, shall we say, jittery, the Tundra’s suspension was almost the opposite, with tuning soft enough to make things feel a little bit spongy down below when the roads got rough. On average roads, the dividends of the Tundra’s softer, two-wheel drive suspension tuning were a more compliant ride and slightly less-trucky handling than the Titan PRO-4X.

There was a price to be paid for that more luxe experience delivered by the Tundra 1794 Edition, and we’re not necessarily talking MSRP. In the next installment of our review of the 2014 Toyota Tundra 1794 Edition, we’ll talk fuel economy.

Disclosure: Toyota provided the vehicle, insurance, and a tank of gas.

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